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Friday, August 7, 2020 | History

2 edition of Breeding design considerations for coastal douglas-fir found in the catalog.

Breeding design considerations for coastal douglas-fir

Randy Johnson

Breeding design considerations for coastal douglas-fir

by Randy Johnson

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  • 19 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station in Portland, OR .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas fir -- Breeding -- Northwest, Pacific.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementRandy Johnson.
    SeriesGeneral technical report PNW -- GTR-411., General technical report PNW -- 411.
    ContributionsPacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination34 p. :
    Number of Pages34
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17696671M

    thousand Douglas-fir crosses across the Pacific Northwest (PNW). A critical need exists for scientists to document successful controlled-crossing techniques for Douglas-fir so that the next generation of tree breeders has the tools necessary to efficiently and cost-effectively complete mating designs. The Coastal Douglas-fir Biogeoclimatic Zone is a unique set of associated ecosystems that occurs on a narrow strip of south-east Vancouver Island, portions of the Gulf Islands, and pockets along the south coast and mainland of British Columbia.

    Non-Microform Reproductions: (FN 1) PCC practice: Catalogers should be aware of the BIBCO Provider-Neutral E-Monograph Guide ( Spatial variation patterns of tree heights at ages from 6 to 12 years in a series of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.)Franco) progeny trials that were conducted on 66 test sites over southern coastal British Columbia were examined with conventional statistics and geostatistical by:

      Anekonda T, Jones C, Smith BN, Hansen LD () Differences in physiology and growth between coastal and inland varieties of Douglas-fir seedlings in a common garden. Thermochim Acta – doi: / CrossRef Google ScholarCited by: Background. Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), one of the most economically and ecologically important tree species in the world, also has one of the largest tree breeding gh the coastal and interior varieties of Douglas-fir (vars. menziesii and glauca) are native to North America, the coastal variety is also widely planted for timber production in Europe, New Zealand Cited by:


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Breeding design considerations for coastal douglas-fir by Randy Johnson Download PDF EPUB FB2

PDF | The basic principles of designing forest tree breeding programs are reviewed for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) in the Pacific | Find, read and cite all the research.

31 rows  Breeding Design Considerations for Coastal Douglas-Fir Randy Johnson. Author RANDY. Breeding design considerations for coastal douglas-fir. 1 online resource (34 p.) (OCoLC) Microfiche: Johnson, Randy. Breeding design considerations for coastal douglas-fir. 1 microfiche (OCoLC) Online version: Johnson, Randy.

Breeding design considerations for coastal. Breeding design considerations for coastal douglas-fir. 1 online resource (34 p.) (OCoLC) Print version: Johnson, Randy. Breeding design considerations for coastal douglas-fir.

34 p. (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors. Breeding design considerations for coastal douglas-fir. 34 p. (OCoLC) Microfiche: Johnson, Randy. Breeding design considerations for coastal douglas-fir.

1 microfiche (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File. Johnson, Randy. Breeding design considerations for coastal Douglas-fir.

Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR 1. Portland, OR US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 34 p. The basic principles of designing forest tree breeding programs are reviewed for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga meziesii (Mirb.).

BREEDING DOUGLAS-FIR embryo). This facilitates genetic analyses using protein (allozyme) or DNA-based molecular markers. The maternal haplotype can be easily measured, and the paternal contribution can be deduced by comparing the genotype of the embryo wih the haplotype of the seed megagame­ tophyte.

Expected efficiencies of mating designs for reselection of parents Breeding Design Considerations for Coastal Douglas-Fir. Book describes separate parallel individual treatments of parent. This book provides an overview of research activities and findings that highlight unique aspects of Douglas-fir physiology, genetics, and other related issues.

It begins with the evolutionary history and distribution of Douglas-fir and provides a detailed description of introductions of Douglas-fir. The Illumina datasets represented coastal Douglas-fir ( and million reads), interior Douglas-fir ( million reads), and a Yakima population similar to interior Douglas-fir ( The Coast Douglas Fir reaches maturity and begins producing cones at 12 to 15 years old.

The male cones are usually about 2 centimeters long and are a yellow or dark red color. The female cones are a bit larger at about 3 centimeters long and are green or dark red in color. generation breeding and testing strategy for coastal Douglas-fir was developed between and Implementation of the advanced-generation testing program has been fairly similar to the proposed strategy, although there have been some deviations.

First-generation testing programsAuthor: K. J.S. Jayawickrama, G.R. Johnson, T. Interior Douglas-fir Tree Breeding Program. The Interior Douglas-fir tree breeding program began in with the objective of producing improved and genetically diverse seed for planting on productive forest land in south-central British Columbia.

The breeding goal is to. Randy Johnson. US Forest Service Breeding Douglas‐Fir. Chapter. Jun ; Breeding Design Considerations for Coastal Douglas-Fir. Article. Full-text available. Breeding design considerations for coastal douglas-fir [microform] / Randy Johnson Breeding design considerations for coastal douglas-fir [electronic resource] / Randy Johnson Jack / Judy Johnson.

The Coastal Douglas-fir (CDF) is the smallest of the 14 BC ecosystems listed in the Biogeoclimatic Ecosystem Classification system. It is restricted to low elevations along southeastern Vancouver Island, from Bowser to Victoria, the Gulf Islands south of Cortes Island, and a narrow strip along the Sunshine Coast near Halfmoon Bay.

GENERAL BOTANICAL CHARACTERISTICS: Coast Douglas-fir is a large, coniferous, evergreen tree. Adapted to a moist, mild climate, it grows bigger and more rapidly than the inland variety.

Trees 5 to 6 feet ( cm) in diameter ( cm) and feet (76 m) or more in height are common in old-growth stands [].These trees commonly live more than years and occasionally more than 1, Pseudotsuga menziesii var.

menziesii, also known as Coast Douglas-fir, Pacific Douglas-fir, Oregon pine, or Douglas spruce, is an evergreen conifer native to western North America from west-central British Columbia, Canada southward to central California, United Oregon and Washington its range is continuous from the Cascades crest west to the Pacific Coast Ranges and Pacific : Pinaceae.

For coastal Douglas-fir from the same tree breeding program in British Columbia, El-Kassaby et al. () further found genetic correlations of (±) of Resistograph values with wood density values derived from x-ray densitometry.

Here, we rely on this well-established proxy methodology to make relative comparisons among genetic classes. Douglas-fir trees in some foothills around the Willamette Valley are afflicted with Swiss needle cast.

The disease produces a pale overall appearance and sparse crown as individual needles turn yellow and drop. “Swiss needle cast disease has been a problem in coastal.

Inter-provenance hybrids of Pinuscaribaea var. hondurensis wereprogeny tested in Queensland, Australia inorder to assess the feasibility ofincorporating some desirable traits intothe local breeding population, consistinglargely of a single upland provenanceMountain Pine Ridge (MPR).

Data onphenotypic traits up to seven years fromplanting revealed that an inter-provenancehybrid, MPR × coastal Cited by: 2.Tree improvement and breeding efforts in coastal Douglas-fir are restricted to three seed production units.

Seed Production Units (SPU) SPU 1. SPU 1 ranges from 0 to metres elevation in coastal areas west of the Coast Mountains. It is the most important coastal Douglas-fir SPU. Currently, both industrial and private landowners in the Western Gulf Forest Tree Improvement Program (WGFTIP) area are compensated for their timber primarily based on the weight or volume of green wood reaching the mill gate.

This places an immediate economic focus on adaptability and volume growth. However, selection for volume growth alone could result in decreased wood Cited by: 8.